Tag Archives: call for papers

American Association of Geographers – Call for Papers

After these god-awful, life-stopping exams, I have to get down to several pending journal articles. One of them is for an Australian-based journal called Still. There are several AAG Call for Papers that seem to go with the topic and other half-completed works, so I may attend AAG in Las Vegas again next year.

Q: What kind of potential and current law school students will you find at the American Association of Geographers?

A: The ones doing Marine and Navigation Law

Ok, I admit, that was a bad one.

Waiting

Call for Papers for the 2009 Association of American Geographers Annual
Meeting, March 22-27, Las Vegas

Organizers:

Craig Jeffrey, University of Washington
Geraldine Pratt, University of British Columbia

We all wait. As Henri Lefebvre argued, waiting is a prominent feature of modern everyday life. In the second half of the twentieth century, in particular, the increasing regimentation and bureaucratization of time in the West, combined with the growing reach of the state created multiple settings – such as bus stands, clinics and offices – in which people were compelled to wait (Moran 2008). Papers in this proposed session might examine these everyday spaces of waiting, including the politics that emerges in places such as the queue (Corbridge 2003). We are also interested in papers that consider the apparent proliferation of contexts in which
people wait for years or whole lifetimes. Of course, there is nothing new about prolonged waiting. But Bayart (2007) has persuasively argued that varied populations are increasingly being forced to live in limbo. Papers in this session might discuss elite, subaltern or middle class experiences of chronic waiting; the causes of prolonged waiting; pathways out of limbo; vernacular conceptualizations of waiting; and spatialized cultural, social and political projects that emerge within communities in wait.

These foci should not be seen as restrictive, and we welcome papers from scholars who approach waiting from other perspectives and contributions from people who had not previously thought of their research in terms of waiting but who are interested in shared discussion around this idea. For example, papers might also investigate how waiting might be theorized within geography and related disciplines (e.g. Bissell 2007), the limits of waiting
as a basis for reflecting on politics and subjectivity formation, historical geographies of waiting, waiting as a methodology, architectures of waiting, or waiting and academic professional practice (Bourdieu 2000).

Please send a title and if possible also a short abstract to Craig Jeffrey at cjj3@u.washington.edu by October 4th if you are interested in this topic,
and please forward this message to others who might be interested.

Dr. Craig Jeffrey
Associate Professor in Geography and International Studies
University of Washington
Department of Geography Box 353550
Seattle, WA 98195
USA

11.8 million and waiting, confined in a certain space and territory.
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Ontology, Space and Radical Politics

The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space Research Network invites you to:

Ontology, Space & Radical Politics, 4-5 August 2008

August 4th: Radical Politics Today, Community Forum

Long Beach Public Library, 101 Pacific Avenue, Civic Center Plaza, Long

Beach, 90822, 6-8pm

Panelists: Gilda Haas | Strategic Action for a Just Economy, Los Angeles; Laura Pulido | American Studies and Ethnicity, University of Southern California; Goetz Wolff | Harry Bridges Institute, San Pedro & University of California, Los Angeles

Moderator: Jon Pugh| Director, The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space Network & Geography, Politics and Sociology, University of Newcastle

August 5th: Ontology, Space & Radical Politics, Workshop

Karl Anatol Center, California State University, Long Beach, 9am-430pm

Speakers: Nigel Thrift | Vice-Chancellor, Warwick University; Edward Soja | Urban Planning, University of California, Los Angeles; Lawrence Berg | Geography,

University of British Columbia; John Paul Jones III | Geography and Regional Development, University of Arizona; Sallie Marston | Geography and Regional Development, University of Arizona; Keith Woodward | Geography, University of Exeter; Liz Philipose | Women’s Studies, California State University, Long Beach; Mary Thomas | Women’s Studies & Geography, Ohio State University

Moderator: Deborah Thien| Node Director, The Spaces of Democracy and the Democracy of Space Network & Geography, California State University, Long Beach

For further information about these events, or to reserve workshop space, please contact Deborah Thien at dthien@csulb.edu.

Flyer available in PDF format here:

http://www.csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/geography/faculty/thien/documents/SpacesofDemocracy_CSULB1flyer.pdf

or here: http://www.csulb.edu/colleges/cla/departments/geography/faculty/thien/

Please circulate widely, with thanks.

Deborah Thien, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Department of Geography

Book Review Editor, Emotion, Space & Society

Node Director, Spaces of Democracy, Democracy of Space

California State University, Long Beach

Telephone:         (+1) 562-985-7072

Email:                dthien@csulb.edu

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Still – Call for Papers

All the discussions around “waiting” on the critical geography listserve has led to a “call for papers” interest – On Still and Stillness … What better word to describe our lives? DREAMers are indeed constrained physically and temporally. Songs are also floating around on “waiting” – Do we have any poems from and by DREAMers on this? I haven’t seen any DREAM poetry, come to think of it.

Below is the email and information for submitting your academic papers

—————————————————————————————

‘Still’

A topology of stillness haunts the space of flows. Against a backdrop of increasing research in mobilities and the mobilisation of forces of all kinds, in this issue of M/C Journal we seek submissions that attend to and reflect upon stillness. ‘Still’ might be many things: stillness as descriptor of a particular form of action, behaviour or disposition; stillness in an object sense; or still as in an action – to become still. This multiplicity, in turn, prompts many questions. How much effort is required to remain still or keep other bodies, things or ideas still? What might it be to think through ‘still’ not as a coherent and singular being-in-the-world, but something that is more fluid, diverse, fragmented and splintered? As such, what are some of the various configurations, vocabularies and politics of stillness?

Perhaps this could involve stillness as a strategy, such as to ignore or dissipate the actions of others. In the writings of idlers, or in the actions of those who refuse or cannot move into lives of permanent transit, we can see the actions of still. Here, stillness might emerge as a particular capacity in order to achieve something – where stillness becomes a productive tool rather than apprehended as a weak form of action. Alternatively, there is the still implied by delegation that comes about through trust in objects or various dispositions of delegation. Can we think about still as form of Spinozian pact, or a collective suspension? Stillness might be restorative whereby rest or being still assists with the activities of the day. Is mesmeric, dreamy stillness different from radical stillness? What about stillness that is, paradoxically, active – where it is willed, coerced or designed? What about a more passive stillness that is not willed intentionally by the body? What do these different forms of ‘still’ do to the body? What do they demand from the body? What are some of the bodily shapes and comportments that are associated with different forms of being or doing ‘still’? And since they are not mutually discrete, how are different stills related to each other?

Still in the social sciences has often been a limited antithetical relation with life, animation and ineluctability of perpetual motion: it is the arrest of photography, or the limit of a frame. Perhaps in Walter Benjamin’s phrase the ‘archaic stillness’ of text we see the power of stillness moving through time, but on the whole, still has enduring pejorative associations with passivity, the feminine and notions of negation. In this issue we seek to expand, recuperate and explore further stillness beyond these narrow affiliations. What does an appreciation of still do to our understanding of action and practice? As Paul Harrison claims, perhaps stillness is a necessary and ‘intrinsic rather than contingent aspect of activity’. For instance, contemporary networked infrastructures produce subjectivities and ontologies in which the relation of stillness to movement is not binary or negative but fully integrated into the processes, aesthetics and politics of mobility. Stillness in all its forms is more critical in contemporary life, by virtue of and not despite, increased mobility. And yet stillness remains more or less unexplored. In this issue of M/C Journal we ask what, then, is significant about still?

Article deadline: 16 Jan. 2009
Release date: 11 Mar. 2009
Editors: David Bissell (University of Brighton) and Gillian Fuller (University of New South Wales)
Journal website: http://journal.media-culture.org.au/

Please send any enquiries, and complete articles of 3000 words, to still@journal.media-culture.org.au.

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Call for Papers – Resistance Studies Magazine

The second issue of the Resistance Studies Magazine – call for papers!

The editors are calling for:

* Papers (articles concerning resistance, power and social change; 2000-4000 words). We will accept original research, essays, and reports in English.

* Book reviews (500-4000 words).

* Relevant interviews (flexible word count)

For submission guidelines, please go to the Magazine page.

Dead Line: April 1st.

Estimated publication: Late April/early May.

The Resistance Studies Magazine is a multidisciplinary peer-reviewed magazine distributed as an electronic publication (ISSN 1654-7063). The general aim is to promote research within the field of resistance studies, and to ground a global debate and a critique of contemporary issues on power and resistance. It is always available for free download.

If you have ideas, drafts, or just want to know more – please do not hesitate to contact Christopher Kullenberg (editor) at christopher.kullenberg@theorysc.gu.se (please also send to christopher.kullenberg@gmail.com for safe correspondence).

Christopher Kullenberg

Department for History of Ideas and Theory of Science

Box 200, 40530 Göteborg

Tel. +46(0)317865559

Fax. +46(0)317864548

http://www.hum.gu.se/~vetck/

christopher.kullenberg@theorysc.gu.se

Skype: christopher.kullenberg

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Call for Papers: E-pisteme

Call for Papers: E-pisteme
Theme: Voice

Deadline: 15 April 2008

Please circulate this CFP, below and attached in PDF.

E-pisteme, a postgraduate e-journal based in the Faculty of Humanities and
Social Sciences at Newcastle University, is dedicated to publishing fresh
and vibrant research of the highest quality from postgraduate students and
postdoctoral scholars.  The journal focuses on themes that reach across
disciplines, seeking to challenge traditionally defined ways of thinking
and doing research. E-pisteme is designed as a forum for international
academic exchange and aims to publish peer-reviewed scholarly articles by
new researchers, providing an opportunity for postgraduates to write in an
academic style for an interdisciplinary readership.

We are pleased to announce that E-pisteme is now accepting articles for its
inaugural issue on the theme of ‘VOICE’.  The issue aims to explore some
of the complexities of the concept ‘voice’ by bringing together
contributions of masters, doctoral and postdoctoral researchers working in
a variety of disciplines across the Humanities and Social Sciences.

Suggested areas for articles include, but are not restricted to:

Voice and Identity
Voice and Power
Marginalized voices (linguistic, cultural, political, etc.)
The ‘death of the author’?
Nationalism
Forbidden voices – Censorship
Translating Voices
Voice and the Media
e-voices

Please send article submissions as MS Word attachments via e-mail to:
e-pisteme@ncl.ac.uk

All submitted articles must contain the following information:

.       Name
.       Affiliation
.       Stage of study
.       E-mail address
.       Abstract (100-200 words)
.       3 to 5 Keywords

For more information about E-pisteme and our submission guidelines please
visit our
website:  http://research.ncl.ac.uk/e-pisteme/
<https://owa.ncl.ac.uk/exchweb/bin/redir.asp?URL=http://research.ncl.ac.uk/e-pisteme/>

Deadline for submissions:  15th April 2008

E-pisteme Editorial Board
Newcastle University
e-pisteme@ncl.ac.uk
ISSN 1756-8226

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