02 May 2008 ~ 0 Comments

Voices – Undocumented British Citizen with an American DREAM

My nickname is Mckrakin and I am a proud British citizen.

I identity as an American. I have been here for fifth-teen years in an American society going through grade school, high school, and college. I have been an intricate part of my community and everyone views me as an American. There is a sense of betrayal coming to America and legally being left out to dry because of aging out. I will always be proud to be a British Citizen and it will always be my home.

At the age of ten my parents, siblings, and myself moved from the United Kingdom legally to the United States for my fathers dad job opportunity. We left behind grandparents, uncles, aunts, cousins, friends, and another life. It was a hard transition and culture shock that took a long time to get used to. I am currently the age of twenty-five.

My country of birth is the United Kingdom and I still have a vivid memory of the England that it used to be. I am sure it has changed beyond belief. It would be a good assumption that living in England would not be much different from here. The main point is that we should have the right to choose in the first place. The right to have freedom to do what we want and be where we want. Everyone should have that right. My parents made the right choice at the moment to seize an opportunity. I blame nothing in their fault but do wish that future situations would have been made aware and the consequences. It would have been nice to avoid the situation entirely.

I have received two bachelor degrees of music with an emphasis of Vocal Performance and Music Pedagogy. They were from an accredited American University. Music thou is not my true passion. I am a avid actor and performer. In 2005 I auditioned for the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and got accepted to the prestigious school. Due to my status and lack of money I was unable to attend. It hurt a lot to be so close to my dream yet so far away. The location where I live allowed me to attend college. People don’t think of a British person having an immigration problem. It hurts to not be able to have the rights of a normal citizen. People take freedom for granted.

My greatest dream is to be on stage one day entertaining people away from their busy lives. I want to take an audience away from their problems and worries and allow them to forget them for a while. I love helping people. I hope that all of us dreamers are able to achieve and carry on normal lives. I think we at least deserve that. I know that my situation is not by far not the worst but it is comforting to communicate with others that have similar situations. I want to help all of us so that we can have the freedom we deserve.

My fear is not being able to grow and learn as a human being. I fear of becoming stagnant and numb to the world and myself. I admit there are days that I am so furious with the world and my situation. The few people that do know are unwilling to believe that it is true. I want to be somebody and I most afraid of being nobody and alone.

It is tough for me since I am the only member of my family that has an undocumented status. All of my siblings have work cards and it causes me a great deal of pain not being able to visit family members in England. My immediate family members can return to England on their free will but leaving the U.S bans me for ten years. In 2002 my Grandpa died and it tore me up that I was unable to attend the funeral. I knew my Grandpa quite well since I had been born, but the thought of only seeing him once over the next nine years was hard to bear. The rest of my grandparents are still alive and in good health. I also recently tried out for London acting schools. If I am accepted to the next audition phase, I would be required to go to England to try out. There would be a chance that once there, I might not get accepted into these schools. Do I wait for the Dream Act or try live a life in a unfamiliar country. Time and God will tell. Carpe Diem friends!

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